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Aloud lands song in Sundance World Premiere "Kusama Infinity"

We're exctited to have Aloud's song "Such a Long Time" featured in the this world premiere at this years Sundance Film Festival. The film is about a fledgling yet fierce young Japanese artist who moved to New York City in 1958 after writing to Georgia O'Keeffe to express admiration and seek guidance on how to break into the New York art scene. Miraculously, O’Keeffe wrote back, and an emboldened Yayoi Kusama left behind what she considered the conformist culture of Japan to assert herself in the Big Apple. Inspired by the 1960s American political and social revolution, Kusama’s avant-garde innovations garnered notoriety but little fame or success as she pioneered audacious and unprecedented soft sculptures, staged nude Vietnam protests, and fashioned dazzling polka-dot creations. Encountering both racism and sexism in a realm dominated by men whose work often directly pilfered her concepts, she eventually returned to Tokyo and voluntarily retired to a mental institution. Only in the last couple of decades has the rest of the world caught up to Kusama’s radical vision. A documentary many years in the making, Kusama - Infinity lovingly finds a form that captures the ineffable power of her work and embodies the elusive yet magnetic voice of this genius only now, at 88, receiving her due.

Kris Gruen supporting Alejandro Escovedo

Kris will be supporting Alejandro Escovedo on short run of major Western cities early November. Nov 4 - Santa Fe, NM - GiG Performance SpaceNov 5 - Denver, CO - The Soiled Dove UndergroundNov 7 - Salt Lake City, UT - The State Room

Young Mister to release "Soft Rock" Oct 27th

When asked to put together some songs that reflected his intimate solo performance in BMG's Los Angeles office the past spring, Fiore drew from a few ideas he’d been toying with in the months prior and wrote two new songs, completing the task in two months time. The short collection of minimally produced ballads appropriately titled Soft Rock is more stripped down than the self-titled debut album released last year. The lead single, Infinite Space, was inspired by a podcast that discussed the possibilities of extraterrestrial life. Fiore says “One contributor stated that he believed life existed elsewhere but was heartbroken by the fact that we may never get to see their faces. This struck a chord in me, as the true nerd in me is also saddened at the thought of never meeting aliens. I’ve often felt like a loner growing up, as if no one truly understood me, so I tied the sentiment from the podcast into the idea that maybe the only beings that I could ever truly identify with are living somewhere in a galaxy far, far away—too far to ever reach.” This track features backing vocals from Christie Dupree of the bands Eisley and Merriment. The EP highlights Fiore’s signature “energetic yet considered songwriting” (Popmatters) where he crafts songs that are “gentle, sincere, and built with a strong hook” (Consequence of Sound). Produced by Fiore, Soft Rock was recorded in assorted studios in Charleston, SC, Nashville, TN, and Asheville, NC by Dan McCurry, Taylor Bray, Matt Lohan, and Fiore himself, and mixed in Brooklyn, NY by Charles Newman (The Magnetic Fields, The Bones of J.R. Jones).

New Placements: Mother Feather, Shim in Showtime's Shameless

Listen to songs from Mother Feather and Shim in the upcoming season of Showtime's Shameless. Both songs are featured in the season premiere. Shameless season 8 premieres Sunday, November 5, at 9pm ET/PT.

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Album: Music For Outcasts
Genre: Folk
Mood: Cheerful, Comical, Heartfelt, Laid Back, Mellow, Positive
Instrumental: Yes
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Album: Mother Feather
Genre: Alternative, Glam, Pop
Mood: Aggressive, Attitude, Driving, Energetic, Rebellious
Instrumental: Yes
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Cottage Sounds Unlimited

Born in Los Feliz and residing in Brooklyn, Cottage Sounds brings together a widening group of friends and collaborators to this continually growing collection of music and songs.

The Ritualists

The Ritualists is NYC-based dark psychedelia. Fronted by lyricist and multi-instrumentalist, Christian Dryden, the group's fusion of classic glam rock, post punk and modern Brit-pop has raised more than a few eyebrows, earning them comparisons to legends such as David Bowie, Echo and The Bunnymen and The Verve, and the praise of Sex Pistols founder, Glen Matlock. The Ritualists' live show combines aspects of traditional rawk theatricality and classical surrealism. They have awed audiences up and down the east coast, from The Highline Ballroom, NYC to The Masquerade in Atlanta. They were recently one of only 25 other artists chosen to participate in the All About Music festival in Nashville, TN. They have played alongside notable artists such as Lady GaGa, The Fiery Furnaces, Earl Slick, and Love & Rockets. They have performed live for 107.7 WACC in Connecticut and 90.3FM WMSC Radio in Montclair, NJ. The Ritualists are also featured regularly on 107.1 FM, "The Peak" and 93.30 FM in Argentina.

Ape Shifter

Prog-Metal ensemble APE SHIFTER will be releasing their debut album early 2017! APE SHIFTER is all instrumental and reaches from rockin' 70's riffs played with punk rock ferocity to creeping metal grooves. Intense Simian Instrumental Rock from the nasty pits of the Hellabrunn Zoo.

Harper Green

Harper Green is a New York based artist with a haunting, sultry voice. With her first EP "Cannibals", Harper has created her own unique brand of indie-pop, tying subversive lyrics to ominous melodies and edgy production. Her songs leave you on edge, wanting more and with a foreboding sense of anticipation.

Tom Shaner

Tom Shaner writes and plays what he dubs "ghost songs, songs, waltzes, and rock and roll." From rockers to ballads, the songs can be somber or humorous, story songs, or new cinematic folk tunes.

The Come On

The Come On is the brainchild of songwriter Sam Barron and producer Brian Speaker (Jeffrey Lewis, The Fem Doms); an irreverent new wave rock concoction of overdriven Telecaster, vocal harmonies and sparse synth strokes. Their sound merges The Modern Lovers garage rock with a Devo geometry, and honors above all the spirit of T. Rex. In fact, it was after emerging from a T. Rex-induced coma, Sam began to write a new set of songs for the band he and Speaker had envisioned. In the fall of 2016 with drummer Lou Cozza (Darkwing, Looms) and singer/keyboardist Mimi Oz, Sam took the material on the road and after feeling the updraft of the response to the songs, Speaker recorded The Come On live off the floor at his SpeakerSonic Studios right after they returned to Brooklyn. Additional production was added by Charles Newman (Magnetic Fields, Motopony)

Soft News

The self effacing title of Soft News’ debut album, Used Melodies, belies its true nature as an innovative cover album of reimagined 80s pop songs. Each song, from Billy Idol’s “Dancing With Myself,” to “Love Touch” by Rod Stewart is completely stripped of the decade’s trademark glitter and bombast. In contrast, the sound that pervades Used Melodies is intimate, exposed, and soothing. From the first track to the last, Erik Laroi (the man behind Soft News) inspires trust in the listener. His pitch perfect production, crooning voice, and nuanced arrangements deliver the sense that you’re listening to indie renditions of the Great American Songbook. The collection of songs that Soft News covers on Used Melodies weren’t so much diamonds in the rough as diamonds covered in rhinestones, glitter, and neon-colored feathers. Laroi tenderly stripped them of their shimmer and glue to reveal the true gems sparkling beneath. Used Melodies was a passion project. Over the past four years, he’s been recording covers in his home studio, selecting songs as the inspiration strikes. He was grocery shopping when “Separate Ways” by Journey came on over the sound system. Laroi couldn’t shake the melancholic alternate version that was cycling through his head and so he recorded it. He did this with approximately 30 songs from the 80s and early 90s (there are two exceptions: a gorgeous version of Big Star’s 1975 classic “Holocaust” and a complete re-interpretation of Pulseprogramming’s 2003 IDM-inspired track “Blooms Eventually”). Laroi enlisted Charles Newman (The Magnetic Fields, Jon DeRosa) to mix them. Laroi had no commercial intent for the project but while mixing, Newman heard an album in the works. Laroi and Newman picked their twelve favorite covers and Used Melodies was born. It will be released on Newman’s label, Mother West, in fall 2014. If you hear a hint of Kings of Convenience in Laroi’s rich, clear vocals, it may be because they are his Norwegian countrymen. Originally from Norway, Erik Laroi spent much of his childhood in Detroit and London. This is where he soaked up 80s pop culture, making weekly trips to the record store with his older brother to pick up the latest album by New Wave cult bands like New Order, The Cure, Depeche Mode, and The Smiths. As he got older, Laroi’s tastes broadened, discovering bands like Red House Painters and Low, as well as singer-songwriters like Nick Drake and Joni Mitchell. This wandering path of musical exploration led him to create Used Melodies, an album that takes a decidedly grown-up approach to childhood nostalgia – resurrecting it to fit the present. Used Melodies by Soft News was recorded and produced by Erik Laroi in his home studio in New York. The album was mixed by Charles Newman and Ray Ketchem (Elk City, The Mendoza Line). The tracks feature backing vocals by Lorraine Lelis (Mahogany, Aarktica) and Margaret White (Sparklehorse) and string arrangements by Perry Serpa (TV On The Radio, The Sharp Things) and Jean Cook (Ida, Mountain Ocean Sun).

Leland Sundries

Leland Sundries, a band from NYC led by Nick Loss-Eaton, is dedicated to storytelling in a way that recalls Woody Guthrie and his Folkways brethren. [Their] scrappy Americana will get you longing for empty two-lane highways and kudzu-encased back porches.” – New York Times “Not only does Brooklyn singer-songwriter Nick Loss-Eaton write richly detailed, sepia-toned tunes that layer America then and now atop one another like a ghostly palimpsest, he’s just as handy at knocking out Johnny Cash-worthy trifles like ‘Giving Up Redheads.’ His quartet has been spending a lot of quality road time lately, so expect them to be well-marinated for this homecoming gig.” – The Village Voice “Excellent.” – iTunes “Reminiscent of Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy and Elvis Perkins.” – Baeble Music “Oddball storytelling with a lo-fi country sensibility” – Time Out New York “Leland Sundries singer/picker Nick Loss-Eaton’s the-Band-meets-Lou-Reed approach mates gnawing electric guitar and old-time acoustic six-string, banjo, and harmonica melodies with dry-witted, drawling, modern-day ennui.” – Boston Phoenix “[The] narratives of bus rides, trains and bars, windmills, roast beef sandwiches and Russian overcoats are penned with a novelist’s eye for detail and delivered in a wry New York baritone.” – No Depression “What Lou Reed would sound like if he was asked to front Tom Waits’ Mule Variations band… Highly recommended to fans of Leonard Cohen.” – My Old Kentucky Blog “One of the more striking debuts this annum… Let’s hear a full-length, soon.” – Blurt, 8 stars (out of 10) “The whole schmegie has that latter-day Waits/early morning Leonard Cohen vibe about it.” – Philadelphia City Pages Online “A wholly original outfit that just released one of the most exciting musical debuts of the year.” – PopDose Crackling garage rock meets literate indie rock in a sound marinated in the extremes of New York City on Music For Outcasts, the full-length debut and first UK/European release for Leland Sundries. It comes out February 5 2016 on L’Echiquier Records in conjunction with Décor Records, and places Leland Sundries in the context of bands that combine literacy with overdrive such as Silver Jews, Deer Tick, Jack Oblivian, Wooden Wand, The Hold Steady, Johnny Thunders, The Modern Lovers and Ezra Furman. Leland Sundries is the portmanteau under which frontman Nick Loss-Eaton and an ever-evolving roster of Brooklyn, NYC musicians produce the kind of careering, scrappy garage rock which has -via nascent EP releases- already earned the band nods from The New York Times and Timeout. Music For Outcasts itself was shaped by the fall out from two particularly pivotal events in Loss-Eaton’s life, the last few years of which have seen him not only recover from alcohol dependency, but go on to survive emergency open heart surgery. Fairly white-knuckle, stare-down-your-mortality fare for anyone, never mind someone barely out their twenties, and a live-it-out experience which bears its blackly humorous mark across Music For Outcasts. Ironically, the surgery itself presented Loss-Eaton with the opportunity for his first ‘holiday’ in over 4 years- a chance which took him (not entirely to his doctor’s ease) to the UK & Europe for several weeks, to begin work on what became Music For Outcasts. He says, “I hooked up with UK artist/producer Alexander Festival Hall to demo the songs in his tiny East London studio.” Studio recordings were then made in an unheated loft studio in Nick’s old neighbourhood of Greenpoint, in a former creamery building nestled next to a bridge between Brooklyn and Queens, much of it recorded on analogue tape. Around half of the tracks which comprise the record were written prior to Loss-Eaton’s recovery from alcoholism, rendering them – as Nick wryly noted during subsequent recording sessions – ‘time capsules back to a time of desperation’. For evidence of this pressure-cooker effect in microcosm, look no further than the surf-rock wash of ‘Greyhound From Reno’, which zeros in on the pill-hazed, midnight exodus of a shady character skipping town. Whilst the track lampoons its sleazy, washed up protagonist, Loss-Eaton delivers its underlying inference direct to the mirror, written as it was at the tail end of his addiction; ‘It’s impressionistic, non-linear, but that sense you can’t outrun yourself is palpable’. The track came eventually came together in aptly chaotic fashion during late-night recording takes; ‘We turned out all the lights in the studio and it got weird. I sang and screamed until I went hoarse, and it felt like an exorcism of panic’. Elsewhere on Music For Outcasts, Loss-Eaton turns the microscope on his own scars with a similarly unflinching candour. ‘Freckle Blues’ (written whilst New York was holed up during Hurricane Irene) equates the elapse of time since a relationship’s demise with his own date tally of sobriety, and ‘Maps of The West’ traces an ill-advised foray into dating whilst in the early stages of abstinence. ‘They recommend against this, and I soon saw why’ recalls Nick; ‘I fell hard for her. Should have known it wouldn’t work out when she took me to a bar. She drank whiskey. I drank seltzer.’ That said, the song nonetheless taps the fledging stability that his recovery brought to proceedings; ‘I found a measure of hope in being sober that wasn’t there in my life or my writing before’. And yet beyond the more personal scorched earth the record rakes over, there is a wider resonance within the world of misfits and missed connections that Music For Outcasts inhabits. Fittingly for one who snatches fragments of lyric ideas from overheard conversations & glimpses into the lives of others, the characters and vignettes which Loss-Eaton summons here are so vivid as to become almost tangible. ‘Stripper From Bensonhurst’ mines far beyond the attendant stereotypes to chart the push/pull between a grim domestic semblance of normality far more intolerable to this woman than her nocturnal ‘other life’, whilst the taut, Spoon-esque snap and swivel of ‘Radiator Sabotage’ paints a world of burnt-out glamour as palpable as any of Lou Reed’s succinct dispatches. Even the track titles themselves – ‘Studebaker’, ‘Wallace ID’ – function almost like projector slides, brief flashes of narrative which demand conjecture. Two studio EPs, a vinyl/digital 7” single, three music videos, and national US touring have already earned Leland Sundries praise from Pop Matters, New Yorker, Magnet, American Songwriter, Village Voice, Time Out NY, Baeble Music, No Depression, Blurt, and Boston Phoenix. The band has performed at Campout Fest (Joshua Tree, CA); taped a Daytrotter session; and shared stages with Spirit Family Reunion, Todd Snider, Marah, Eef Barzelay (leader of Clem Snide), Taylor Hollingsworth (of Conor Oberst & The Mystic Valley Band) and Cracker.


Brooklyn Based Acoustic Folk, rock and blues band with catchy rustic dream ballads.

The Ton Ups

Regarded by many as the original Williamsburg Band. Hey, somebody had to be. The Ton Ups still live and roam the streets of Williamsburg Brooklyn. The Ton Ups play driving garage rock.